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here in washington and around the country, do you -- does the white house feel any obligation to tell fellow democrats to debate this issue but debate it in a peaceful and -- >> the president believes in, you know, debate that's civil. i haven't seen those comments and i'm not sure that they mean what some would interrupt them to be -- interpret them to be, i just haven't seen them. the president has always opposed so-called right to work laws. as he said, those laws are generally political and not economic. they're more about the right to earn less pay than they are, you know, helpful to our economy. . he presented his views on that issue. ? when we were asking about the chicago teacher's strike before the election, you said it was a local issue and the president has, quote, not expressed any opinion or made any assessment about this particular incidence -- incident going on in his hometown. why is this different? it's playing out in michigan, we saw in it wisconsin several months ago. i understand he was in the state of michigan but he's from chicago. why -- >> the president's posit
's foreign relations and what's next for president morrissey. washington redskins -- ♪ host: is this sunday, december 16, 2012. the flag over the u.s. capitol, over the white house, and in many locations across the country are at half staff today because of friday's school shooting in newtown, conn.. the nation's newspapers are full of details about what happened on friday. we would like to hear from you your opinions on how america can prevent mass shootings. is it the role of government or society to stop them? here are the numbers to call. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. you can also find us online. send us a tweet, twitter.com/c- spanwj. or join the conversation on facebook by looking for c-span and weighing in. you can also e mail us, journal@c-span.org. here is the first page -- front page of "the hartford current" this morning. "day of grieving." the top headline, along with a list of the victims. the employees, all women. the children, all around the age of 67. this is "the sunday bulletin." "residents gather to find comfor
of it is prevalent in the papers. wednesday with congress and the president heading back to washington. here is a headline on "usa today." in the wall street journal -- if the in "the washington post." we welcome your phone calls. we will get to them in a moment. we did find another piece at politico. there you have it in the papers this morning about people being optimistic or pessimistic about things. i want to dig a little bit deeper into "the wall street journal" piece. i we will probably see some what of a flurry of activity tomorrow. if first call. what is your name and where are you calling from? i think that caller is gone. let's try the next call. caller: i am optimistic because this is a great country. we are one nation under god that. i think people ought to turn to their faith during these times because we have always needed to through hard times. host: how will this play in washington but the fiscal glove? caller: i think the republicans are going to have to give it more than the democrats. president obama is basically going to do with the people voted him in for. i think he wil
the alternative minimum tax is affecting fiscal negotiations. "washington journal" is next. ♪ ♪ host: 25 days to go before the united states faces the fiscal cliff, the white house has rejected a proposal from house republicans to prevent tax hikes and spending cuts at the end of the year. no formal talks between the two sides are scheduled today. will go outside the nation's capital to get your voice involved. republicans -- democrats -- independents -- send us a tweet, post your comments on facebook, or send us an e-mail. we begin with some of the papers across the country today and how this latest proposal from house republicans is playing out in the papers. courtesy of "the atlantic journal-constitution" -- here is "the denver post" -- finally, here is "of the arizona republic" -- here is "the washington post" on what is inside this deal -- we want to get your take on this. what do you think? ted in new york, a democratic caller. what do you think? caller: good morning. i do not think it goes far enough. i think it was greenspan that i heard last week said in a discussion panel that a rec
sarah kliff, a health care reporter with "the washington post." as we continue our series, we want to take a look at different aspects of what we can expect as we face the january 1 deadline. we want to talk about the said likely the doc fix. many people say you have to understand the doc fix. guest: it is something we have had since about a decade ago. back in 1997, congress set a formula for how to pay doc fares. it worked for about five years until the cost of health care started growing. what we have seen every year is congress passed a temporary pay patch to make up the difference. every year, we get to the end of the year and there is this impending gap. right now if we do not pass it, medicare salaries will go down by 25%. everyone thinks the doc fix is not a good idea and we should fix it permanently. it is something that we face every year. host: if nothing happens next year, the cost is estimated to be $25 billion. over two years, $41 billion. guest: it is expensive and we always have to find a way to pay for it. we are looking for some other cuts that we can make to tota
by chicago tribune columnist clarence page. live recalls, tweets, an e-mail. "washington journal" is next. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] h., congress returns later this week to washington with eight days to go to avoid the so- called fiscal cliff. two republican senators on the sunday talk shows yesterday say they agree with the president's position that both sides should avoid tax hikes on middle-class americans. also, nra executive said the group would not support any new gun laws in this country. good morning this monday, december 24, 2012. we will begin this morning with your thoughts on religion and politics. as a religion influence your political decisions? also send us your tweet if you go to twitter.com -- we will begin with the sunday review section of the "the new york times" yesterday. we want to get your take on this. it does religion influence your politics? with more people saying they are unaffiliated. we want to get your take. here are some comments from facebook this morning. what are your
the 2012 presidential campaign. we will be live with your calls, tweets, and e-mails, "washington journal" is next. ♪ host: good morning , president obama is in hawaii this weekend for the christmas holiday with his family. he will join a congressional delegation later today led by harry reid in services in holland -- in honolulu for late senator daniel inouye passed away last week that congress will return monday to continue fiscal negotiations. we will look at the options ahead for the president as the january deadline looms but we want to begin with your comments on another debate front and center in washington following the tragic shooting in newtown, conn. -- that is gun-control. "the washington post" said a bitter fight ahead. the numbers are on your screen. we look at some of the headlines on the sunday morning beginning with "the connecticut post." - you can see the flag remaining at half staff outside one of the churches in newtown, conn. following the burial of 20 children and six women killed about a week and a half ago. this is from the front page of today's "new yor
the grand bargain that many leaders once imagined. as we take you through all the latest on the "washington journal," we would like to hear what you would like to say to congressional leaders on this 11th hour deal. what tax and spending issues do need included in any compromise. republicans, your number is -- democrats -- independents -- if you are outside the u.s. -- you can also catch up with us on all your favorite social media sites, twitter, facebook, or e- mail us. a very good morning to you. taking to the latest headlines on the fiscal cliff. i will run a few -- through a few of them for you. from "the daily news" -- also "l.a. times" -- i will take to "a "boston globe"" -- "the boston globe" -- the new york post -- the story i want to start with this morning is from politico. that line is -- senate leaders are headed into a critical sunday session of congress with a similar mission to avoid historic tax hikes, setting the stage for a high wire a final act of fiscal cliff negotiating just two days before the country is hit with a series of tough austerity measures. -- that again is
not exactly a bass chan of conservative open borders, "the washington post," and i particularly direct this comment to steve and suggest he tuth have some conversation with the post. on the seventh of july, it put out a major article and this was the headline. u.s. pushes for more scientists but the jobs aren't there. i'll give you a quote in a moment. i did take the opportunity since my agency has a few scientists to interview about this and i said what is your opinion. not all, but the consensus overall, why are we here, we're here because the jobs aren't in the private realm. a second source was organized labor that i recently went to in view of this forum and the public relations person said we agree with the "washington post." i'll leave you with one quote and i invite steve to approach the post. there have been many predictions of science labor shortages said the editor of the online magazine science careers and yet it seems awfulfully hard for people to find a job. anyone who goes into science expecting employers to clam more for their services will be deeply disappointed. >> we
. on the darkest day of 1990 in washington, d.c., i began my ministry. that is something people don't realize, especially those who attack those who work with the indigent or support for the struggling -- or the poor. when i was back in d.c., we had dan and bob and they sat in an irish bar around the corner and worked out the tax bill in 1987, i believe the year was. that's the kind of leadership the article was just talking about. instead of the people that call up and paris at the propaganda, we really have to be practical. -- that parrot the propaganda. a house divided cannot stand. let me give my personal example. i live on $6.66 a day. that is food stamps. that is for single adults. i live on social security, $774 a month. i am trying to go back to cornell to do sustainable energy. we are in a double down on reaganomics in despite. jimmy carter had great inflation because for five years we were a peaceful country again. then reagan put us back into the largest military buildup in peacetime. i think that's what we ought to do is realize that did not work, just like some of the new deal st
-- facebook page. the american people get it. washington is addicted to spending someone else's money. the house has passed two bills that would avert the fiscal cliff. in august to pass a bipartisan bill. the house passed legislation to avoid sequestration by cutting spending. our plan is to take your calls and hear from you over twitter, and to wait it out, to wait and hear what we hear from capitol hill. our cameras are on capitol hill and we hope to be able to give you some coverage of briefings happening on the hill. so far, the house is out and the senate will be out shortly once they finish this series of votes. and it was 12:15 eastern, writing a major setback in fiscal cliff talks. you may have heard sheila jackson lee question this. that negotiations between harry reid and mitch mcconnell suffered a major setback after republicans demanded the inclusion of a new method for calculating benefits for the package. change came from progressives to result in lower payments. part of the current negotiations on the scale down deal, they say that they gave ground on other issues, inc
. looking at some other stories in the news -- the washington post also covers that keeping the justice department had to toughen gun laws ahead of the election. that is the headline. much of the effort was put on hold until after last month's election. according to several officials who knew about the effort. in here is what the story also says. the guns were not on the table according to one anonymous source because everything was shut down in that debate. as we dig into this year, it says the recommendations were discussed with attorney general older and his deputies. there was no indication it was sent to the white house. the recommendations could have had an impact on the access to guns for drug users, criminals, or people with a history of mental illness. host: let's go to the phones and hear from our first caller this morning. greg? caller: good morning, how are you? they talk about needing to have background checks and all of this stuff, but that is not the problem. what it is, i will tell you. they say background checks? it is not background checks, it is your personality, your
is that if there is some movement until the positive direction, which have not seen out of washington and enter a long time, -- in a long time, at least we will not see head winds. we are making some progress. i see that continue. >> i want to come back to what todd said earlier. i am concerned about confidence being fragile. todd reference what happened until august of 2011. we saw in limited to lie confidence tank. market confidence grew jog with some of the market confidence plunged. i think we have to be concerned -- market confidence plunged. if we look like we are not grappling with these key challenges. what happens on january 1, everybody is saying it is a fiscal clove -- a fiscal slope, not a fiscal cliff. it is not like a zombie accomplice happens. if market confidence was up the window, that could be damaging. >> i think is likely there is going to be a deal, some other deadline for another deal next year. it is really important and they not said a whole series of opportunities to have that kind of collapse again. they have a couple months, but they have to make sure whenever they come up with f
religion and american politics. he is introduced by john danforth. from washington university, this is an hour and a half. >> finally, it is my honor to introduce senator john danforth, who will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a
deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington has got a spending problem, not a revenue problem. if the president doesn't agree with our proposal, i believe he's got an obligation to families and small businesses to offer a plan of his own, a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress. we're ready and eager to talk to the president about such a plan. >> you did speak with the president earlier this week. can you characterize that call? did he have any kind of count offer and we understand that he is making clear that it's got to be increase rates for the wealthy or no deal. are you willing to give a little bit? >> the phone call was pleasant but was more of the same. the conversations that the staff had yesterday were more of the same. it's time for the president if he's serious to come back to was a count offer. >> the jobs record indicated unemployment is down roughly a full point from this time last year. if no deal happens -- [inaudible] . why take such a risk when the job numbers are improving. >> because increasing tax rates will hit many small businesses that produc
of the fiscal cliff on state budgets. >> wednesday on, "washington journal," ongoing negotiations on the so-called fiscal cliff. then, we hear from the associated press on how congressional leaders plan to handle social security as part of the talks. later, more on the role of social security ahead with the aarp and the heritage foundation. "washington journal" is live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> the white house was very controversial, as most things in america were. the man who designed washington city -- there was competition. he submitted a design for a palace. americans were not having a palace. it was not particularly odd inspiring. in fact, in 1821, a european diplomat told the congress it was neither large nor on inspiring. -- awe-inspiring. the congressman answered, the building served its purpose. if it were larger and more elegant, perhaps some president would be inclined to become its permanent resident. >> a former new york times book critic has gathered a few of her favorite white house photos. what sunday evening, at 7:30 eastern and pacific, on american history tv. >>
in washington, thanks to you to the bank of america. thanks to you, john, and thanks to your colleagues. so you may have gotten cards. we're be bringing you into the conversation. so be thinking about what you're going to ask. so without further ado, we'll bring in bob woodward. mr. woodward. [applause] >> which is your chair? >> you get the daddy chair. >> thank you. >> so the price of politics, which has become a bestseller, as all your books do, looked at the last cliff, negotiations over the previous grand bargain that didn't quite get over the finish line. what does that teach us about the current cliff negotiations? >> well, it's groundhog day. the question is who's playing bill murray. and i mean, such a repetition. it's the same players at the same seats at the table with the same doctrines. so where this goes, i think anyone who thinks they know is wrong. some people say it's a fiscal cliff. some people say it's a slope. some say it's a bungee jump. some say it's a skateboard trip. it's going to go down and up and so forth. bottom line, i think, it's no way to govern. it is a giant mis
, i have to get to washington to convey the thoughts and the minds of my constituents not only the average citizens but doctors who i sat down with yesterday to ask about this question. but here's my point. now you can look at'9" globally, then i'm going to narrow it down. globally one would say that we're living longer. of course women are -- this is the actuarial genius here. you know the actuarial table you teal with. women are living longer, it's always been a tradition, etc., but the body politic is living longer maybe because they're healthier. that is not the case in the span of what we're speaking of. what we're talking about tpwhreblely or nationally are people who -- whose beginnings are different, whose lifestyles were different, now i don't know that the family farmer, and i'm not picking on that group of people, they work with their hands. of course they work with their minds, they have to have a budget, mange things work but they're in the outdoors. foresters. some would say that's a healthy lifestyle. i don't know if if -- until you walk a mile in their shoes. th
know that in washington introductions is an inverse importance of the person being introduced that's why the governor gave me such a long introduction. i'm going to be briefer here because i think you know these three people very, very well. first of all, there is teresa sullivan who was president and wasn't president and now is president of the university of virginia. we're happy about that. senator mark warner who in recent months and years has had the ability to talk to members of the other party about matters of the great interest to the country and has been very involved in the fiscal cliff negotiations and of course he of before he was senator he was a governor. then steve is the co-founder of america online. is a rabid twitter. i feel like i know every detail of your life. and a relentless of entrepreneurship. we're very fortunate to have these three panelistings. they get five to seven minutes -- there will be a little time left. five to seven minutes to discuss the topic and we're going have a discussion among us then we will open it up to you and hopefully, we will get to
a deal on that this " cliff? is there a washington-wall street disconnect? >> interesting question. i certainly hope that markets will not have to tank. we want to have confidence not just in market but in businesses and households as well. the best way policy makers cna achieve that is by coming to a solution as quickly as possible. markets have obviously already responded to some extent up and down to news about negotiations. on the other hand, it is also true -- if you look at the experience of the debt limit debate in august 2011, and both confidence and markets remain pretty sanguine up to pretty close to the point where it looked like there was a chance that the debt limit would not be riased. then, of course, there was a pretty sharp shock to confidence about the time of the final debates. so, it's not unusual to see markets being complacent. of course, from a market point of view, there is at risk to both directions. if things go well, that would be good news and may be right now markets are taking an average of those two possibilities. policymakerk any including the fed shoul
in the united states to our maximum benefit? at a time when washington is talking about our fiscal crisis i'd say that the relationship of our oil needs to this crisis itself are close. it might not solve our fiscal crisis but clearly it's a necessary ingredient. every recession in the history of the united states in moden times has been preceded by or happening concurrent with an oil price spike. if we don't have continued growth we can cut all we want and raise revenue all we want, but we'll never find a way to solve our fiscal troubles. and i think this report really looks at how do we leverage this great abundance, this great blessing in the united states, both of our resources and of our innovative skills to help the country through these times and put us in a good footing for the next 50, 100 years. and secondly, i think this report really is the beginning of a process of creating an effective deep and stable bipartisan consensus on energy policy, in a town where everything is about the zero sum game. we are trying to escape that zero sum game. and we see the oil security as a unifyin
science and politics. and later, james hansen. >> tomorrow on washington journal, we will talk about the latest on the fiscal cliff with a columnist. that is followed by a look at president obama's cabinet for his second term. our guest is reporter david jackson. and then a look at what is next for iraq. we are joined by author michael gordon. live at 7:00 eastern on c- span. >> i started to get word in the summer and fall of 1774. the british out of roles and diplomats were reporting to the crown the colonists are sending ships everye
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)

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